International Baccalaureate

  • IB Logo

    Welcome to the International Baccalaureate Program at Palm Harbor University High School

     

    Welcome to the Palm Harbor University High School International Baccalaureate Program website! Your interest in our program has led you to our website which we hope does two things:

    • First, it answers some of the general questions you have about the IB program and how we implement the IB at Palm Harbor;
    • Second, we hope that the information that you glean here will lead you to contact us to further explore your educational opportunities with us.

     

    Mission Statement

    • The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect.
    • To this end the organization works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment.
    • These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.


    Points of Pride:

    • International Diploma recipient percentage is one of the highest in the world
    • National Merit commended scholars, semifinalists and finalists consistently recognized
    • Graduates are accepted in outstanding institutions of higher learning world-wide
    • Teachers receive numerous awards and accolades such as “Teacher of the Year”
    • IB students donate at  least 225 hours of service to the community over four years
    • IB students are leaders in the school, participate in sports, hold offices in student government and clubs
    • Annual traditions include Senior Celebration, Junior Class Pinning, Sophomore Breakfast, and Freshman Social
    • The IB Booster organization supports teachers and students with activities and funding
  • What is the DP?

     

    “Diploma Programme students’ enrollment and outcomes at US postsecondary institution 2008-2014”  (2015)

    Liz Bergeron

    University of Wisconsin, La Crosse

    This study examines patterns of college enrollment, retention and graduation rates of Diploma Programme (DP) students who graduated from public and private high schools in the United States in 2008. Data from two sources were used: the IB information system (IBIS) and the National Student Clearinghouse’s (NSC) student tracker system. Findings show that 92% of DP students graduating from US high schools in 2008 enrolled in US postsecondary institutions between 2008 and 2014, while 78% of students enrolled immediately. The first year retention rate of DP students enrolled in four-year institutions was 98%. The average four-year graduation rate of all DP students (both diploma earners and non-earners) was 79%. Furthermore, DP students (both diploma earners and non-earners) have notably higher six-year graduation rates (83%) than the 2009 national average of 56% (NCHEMS n.d.).

    Research brief 
    Full report 

     

    “The impact of creativity, action, service (CAS) on students and communities” (2017)

    Mary Hayden, Anthony Hemmens, Shona McIntosh, Andrés Sandoval-Hernández, Jeff Thompson

    University of Bath

    This study explored the impact on students, schools and communities of one component of the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme (DP): creativity, action, service (CAS). The study involved three groups of participants: current DP students, staff responsible for delivering or supporting CAS, and DP alumni. Perceptions of CAS, details of CAS activities and examples of good practice in schools were collected via online surveys. Survey responses were submitted from 7,973 students, 490 coordinators and 903 alumni from the Africa, Europe, Middle East (AEM) and Asia-Pacific (AP) regions. Coordinators, students and alumni believed that CAS helps students to become better at “taking on new challenges”, “learning to persevere” and “developing better interpersonal skills”. Moreover, students overwhelmingly viewed CAS as “challenging” but “worthwhile”. Two variables were found to be important for successful CAS implementation: students perceiving CAS as a valuable use of their time and goal setting before beginning CAS activities. Coordinators also suggested that a successful CAS programme depends on identifying CAS activities that students consider to be both meaningful and enjoyable.

    Research snapshot 
    Research summary 

    Full report